Our Gastroenterology Blog

Posts for: January, 2020

By Advanced Gastroenterology Group
January 30, 2020
Category: Gastroenterology

If you are dealing with a digestive disorder or injury you may end up dealing with a bleed within the gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms may or may not be apparent, depending on where the bleed is occurring within the digestive tract. Those with visible symptoms may notice rectal bleeding, black stools or they may vomit blood. Those with less visible symptoms may experience other problems such as dizziness, abdominal pain or trouble breathing. If you notice any changes in your bowels it’s important that you turn to a gastroenterologist.

Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is often caused by:

  • Peptic ulcers: This is usually the most common cause of bleeding with the upper GI tract. Everything from a bacterial infection to certain medications can cause sores to develop within the lining of the stomach and small intestines.
  • Tears in the esophagus: Esophageal tears can cause a significant amount of bleeding and most commonly occur in heavy drinkers but can also be the result of violent coughing or vomiting.
  • Esophagitis: Esophagitis, or inflammation of the esophagus, is often caused by a condition known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This may cause vomiting that resembles coffee grounds.

Lower gastrointestinal bleeding often causes changes in bowel habits. The causes of lower GI bleeds include, :

  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): IBD includes both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, which cause inflammation and sometimes sores to develop within certain parts of the digestive tract. This often presents with bloody diarrhea or bright red blood in stools. Other symptoms include weight loss, abdominal pain and loss of appetite.
  • Diverticulitis: When pouches in the digestive tract develop this is known as diverticulosis, which often doesn’t cause symptoms; however, if one or more pouches become infected this results in diverticulitis, which can produce a significant amount of blood in the stool.
  • Colon polyps: This lump that forms on the large intestines won’t often cause symptoms; however, some people may notice abdominal pain, mucus in the stool, or blood. Rectal bleeding is usually the most common symptom associated with colon polyps.

If you experience any warning signs of bleeding within the gastrointestinal tract then it’s time to see a GI doctor as soon as possible. Symptoms such as vomiting blood or significant rectal bleeding should be treated immediately.


Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacteria that lives in the stomach of over half the people in the world.  While it can cause common diseases like gastritis and ulcers of both the stomach and beginning of the small intestine (the duodenum), it has also been known to be a risk factor for stomach cancer.  A study being published in the January 30, 2020 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine examined the benefits of treating H. pylori infection in patients who had a 1st degree relative (parent, sibling, or child) with stomach cancer.  The authors found that there was a 73% reduction in the risk of stomach cancer in those patients who were cured of the H. pylori infection.  Though stomach cancer is a less common cause of cancer, patients with a family history of stomach cancer should be tested for H. pylori infection with subsequent treatment and confirmation of cure if positive.  To find out more about H. pylori infection and how you can be tested, please call and make an appointment.


By Advanced Gastroenterology Group
January 14, 2020
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Crohn's Disease  

If you know someone with Crohn’s disease, or you have it yourself, you know about the dramatic effect it can have on your life. It is a type of inflammatory bowel disease or IBD which causes severe inflammation of your digestive tract.

In severe cases, it can be debilitating and life-threatening. The Centers for Disease Control, CDC, estimate that between 26 and 199 people per 100,000 suffer from Crohn's disease. Most people with Crohn's disease develop it when they are between the ages of 15 and 40, however, people of any age can develop the condition.

The fact is, Crohn’s disease is complicated, producing a variety of symptoms including severe intestinal and stomach pain. In addition to severe pain, Crohn’s disease often produces signs and symptoms like these:

  • Ulcers in your intestines
  • Chronic fever and fatigue
  • Blood in your stool
  • Reduced appetite and weight loss
  • Abdominal cramping and diarrhea

Crohn’s disease also affects other areas of your body, producing additional signs and symptoms, including:

  • Irritated eyes
  • Mouth sores
  • Skin inflammation
  • Joint pain and inflammation

The exact cause of Crohn’s disease is unknown, but it may have a hereditary component, or be caused by an overactive immune system. The good news is, Crohn’s disease can be effectively managed by your gastroenterologist. Treatment for Crohn’s disease may include:

  • Tests to check for anemia and other nutritional deficiencies
  • Vitamin and nutrient supplementation
  • Corticosteroid medications to reduce digestive system inflammation
  • Immunosuppressive medications to reduce inflammation and symptoms
  • Antibiotics to eliminate bacteria which may be causing an infection

Severe cases of Crohn’s disease may require surgery. Your gastroenterologist may discuss surgical treatment with you if it is recommended in your case.

The diagnosis and treatment of Crohn’s disease requires the services and knowledge of an expert, your gastroenterologist. To find out more about the causes, signs, symptoms, and treatment of Crohn’s disease and other gastrointestinal disorders, talk with your gastroenterologist today!