Our Gastroenterology Blog

Posts for tag: Endoscopy

By Advanced Gastroenterology Group
October 17, 2022
Category: GI Care
Tags: Endoscopy  

An endoscopy is a vital diagnostic procedure gastroenterologists use to diagnose and treat a wide variety of conditions affecting your upper digestive system. An endoscopy allows your gastroenterologist to view your esophagus, upper intestine, and stomach.

Gastrointestinal conditions an endoscopy is helpful to diagnose and treat include:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Gastric and peptic ulcers
  • Anemia and celiac disease
  • Gastrointestinal cancer
  • Esophageal cancer

Your gastroenterologist may recommend an endoscopy if you are experiencing:

  • Acute or chronic abdominal pain
  • Continuous nausea
  • Frequent vomiting
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding

Before your endoscopy, you will be asked not to eat or drink anything for 4 to 8 hours before your procedure. Discontinue taking blood thinning medications and NSAIDS before your endoscopy.

Your gastroenterologist may ask you to take a sedative before your procedure, to help you relax before and during your endoscopy. Due to sedation, it’s necessary for you to bring someone with you to drive you home after your procedure.

During the endoscopy, your gastroenterologist will insert a thin, flexible tube into and down your throat. The tube contains a camera on one end. This camera allows your gastroenterologist to examine your esophagus and upper digestive system. If you have polyps or growths, your gastroenterologist can remove them.

An endoscopy also allows your gastroenterologist to take a small sample of tissue. Tissue samples and growths may be sent out for a biopsy. The biopsy can determine whether tissue cells are abnormal, precancerous, or cancerous.

When you have an endoscopy, your gastroenterologist examines your upper digestive system. For a comprehensive examination, your gastroenterologist may also recommend a colonoscopy, to examine your lower digestive system.

An endoscopy is an important diagnostic and treatment tool in common use by gastroenterologists. It’s safe, and effective, and it can even save your life. To find out more about reasons for having an endoscopy and how an endoscopy can protect your health, talk with your gastroenterologist today.

By Advanced Gastroenterology Group
November 21, 2019
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Endoscopy  

There are many reasons why your gastroenterologist may recommend getting an endoscopy. An endoscopy is a simple diagnostic procedure that allows our doctor to be able to examine the lining and walls of the entire GI tract, from the esophagus and stomach to the intestines and the rectum. Our gastroenterologist focuses on diagnosing and treating conditions that affect the stomach, intestines, and colon. Through a simple endoscopy we can diagnose a wide range of health problems and even treat some of them, too.

What is an endoscopy?

An endoscopy uses a thin, flexible tube known as an endoscope that is inserted either into the throat or rectum and guided through the body to check the lining of the intestinal tract. An endoscope has a camera at the end of it, which allows our gastrointestinal doctor to be able view the lining and look for lesions, bleeds, and other problems.

A common type of endoscopy is a colonoscopy, which allows us to be able to examine the colon and rectum to detect colon polyps and other signs of colorectal cancer in patients over 50 years old (as well as patients at a higher risk for colorectal cancer).

What can an endoscopy find?

Our gastroenterologist and his team will use an endoscope to look for both benign and precancerous polyps that often develop within the colon and rectum. We will examine the lining of the intestinal tract to look for other growths and cancerous tumors. An upper endoscopy can also be used to detect certain digestive problems.

Your gastroenterologist may recommend that you get an endoscopy if you are dealing with:

  • Unexplained abdominal pain
  • Persistent bowel changes (diarrhea; constipation)
  • Chronic heartburn or chest pain
  • Signs of an intestinal bleed or blockage
  • Blood in the stool
  • A family history of colon cancer
  • A personal history of colon polyps

Even if everything is fine, both men and women should get routine colonoscopies by the time they turn 50 years old. Those at an increased risk for colon cancer will want to talk with their gastroenterologist about getting screened sooner. A colonoscopy is the most effective tool that we have at our disposal for the early detection of colorectal cancer. If colon polyps are detected during a routine colonoscopy we can also remove them immediately.

If you’ve been told that you need an endoscopy or if you are experiencing any of the symptoms above it’s important that you don’t put off treatment. Call a gastroenterologist today to schedule a comprehensive consultation.