Our Gastroenterology Blog

Posts for tag: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Occasional feelings of heartburn are normal, but if you suffer from heartburn frequently, your heartburn could actually be a sign of gastroesophageal reflux disease, commonly known as GERD. Your gastroenterologist can help you get relief.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease often starts out as gastric reflux. Gastric reflux is caused by the sphincter muscle between your stomach and esophagus not closing properly. The incomplete closure of the muscle allows stomach acid to back up into your esophagus, causing the burning sensation known as heartburn.

Acid reflux can grow worse over time, developing into a chronic condition known as gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD. According to the American College of Gastroenterology, GERD affects over 60 million people in this country. Signs and symptoms of GERD include:

  • Chronic throat pain
  • A sour taste and bad breath
  • Chronic coughing and wheezing
  • Eroding tooth enamel which causes sensitive teeth
  • Chronic chest pain, nausea, and vomiting

You can do a lot to help manage GERD if you:

  • Eat smaller meals
  • Stop smoking and using tobacco products
  • Don’t eat before going to bed or lying down
  • Avoid eating spicy or acidic foods
  • Take over-the-counter antacids

If you are suffering moderate to severe signs and symptoms of GERD, it’s best to visit your gastroenterologist for treatment. GERD is typically diagnosed with an endoscopy. The endoscopy can help identify irritated, inflamed, or ulcerated tissue due to GERD. Your gastroenterologist can prescribe medication to reduce stomach acid, soothe esophageal irritation, and heal ulcerated tissue.

Untreated GERD can lead to serious medical conditions, including:

  • Esophageal inflammation, which results in swelling of your esophagus and difficulty swallowing
  • Esophageal ulcers, which results in nausea, chest pain, and problems swallowing
  • Esophageal narrowing and scarring, which results in problems swallowing
  • Esophageal cancer

You don’t have to suffer the uncomfortable symptoms of GERD when relief is just a phone call away. To find out more about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of GERD, call your gastroenterologist today.

By Advanced Gastroenterology Group
July 07, 2022

Wondering if you could have GERD?

Are you living with acid reflux? If you deal with this problem rather frequently, you could have a chronic condition known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It’s more common than you know, and you could have it. Here’s what you should know about GERD,

What is GERD?

Every time you swallow food, your stomach produces acid to aid digestion. In a healthy gastrointestinal system, a valve in the esophagus opens to allow food and acid to pass from the esophagus to your gut. In those with GERD, the valve that allows food to pass through it may not close fully or open far too often, which can cause these acids to travel back up into the esophagus. If this happens regularly, the lining of the esophagus can become irritated and even damaged.

What Are the Symptoms?

While everyone will probably experience heartburn at some point, you will likely deal with chronic or persistent heartburn if you have GERD. Everybody is different when it comes to their symptoms. Besides heartburn and acid reflux, which are the two main symptoms of GERD, other symptoms include,

  • Sore throat
  • Problems swallowing
  • Belching
  • Gum inflammation
  • Throat irritation
  • Hoarseness
  • Chronic bad breath
  • A bitter taste in the mouth

When Should I See a Gastroenterologist?

It isn’t always easy to know when to visit a gastroenterologist for an evaluation. Of course, if you’ve been dealing with heartburn that occurs twice or more during the week, if your heartburn is only getting worse, if you have trouble swallowing or if heartburn wakes you up at night, then it’s essential that you get your symptoms checked out.

How is GERD Treated?

The goal of treatment is to reduce and even eliminate your symptoms while also helping give the esophagus a chance to heal itself. There will be specific lifestyle changes you will need to make to improve your symptoms, such as,

  • Avoiding or limiting spicy, fatty, fried and acidic foods
  • Limiting caffeine and alcohol
  • Losing weight if obesity or being overweight is a factor
  • Eating smaller, more frequent meals
  • Not eating about two to three hours before bed
  • Not lying down immediately after eating
  • Avoiding shirts or belts that are too tight or put too much pressure around the middle

Certain medications will also be prescribed to help you manage your symptoms better and to help repair the damage done to the esophagus. Surgery may be recommended if you’ve tried all other non-surgical options, but nothing has managed your GERD.

Don’t ignore your acid reflux, especially if you’re dealing with it twice a week. If so, you owe it to yourself to schedule an appointment with your gastroenterologist to find out if you could be dealing with GERD.