Our Gastroenterology Blog

Posts for tag: Hiatal Hernia

By Advanced Gastroenterology Group
January 12, 2022
Tags: Hiatal Hernia  
Hiatal HerniaDo you deal with constant acid reflux? Is heartburn commonplace? Do you feel full quickly after eating? If so, these could all be signs of a condition known as a hiatal hernia. A hiatal hernia happens when part of the stomach pushes through the opening in the diaphragm (the hiatus), which connects to the stomach. While some people may never even know that they have a hiatal hernia, sometimes it can cause digestive issues for others. That’s when you should turn to a gastroenterologist for answers.

What causes a hiatal hernia?

Any kind of intense or increased pressure in this area of the abdomen can lead to a hiatal hernia. Pressure in this area of the digestive tract can occur as a result of,
  • Obesity
  • Pregnancy
  • Coughing
  • Vomiting
  • Heavy lifting or intense physical exertion
  • Straining
What are the signs and symptoms of a hiatal hernia?

You could have a hiatal hernia and not even know it. Most people don’t even realize that they have one; however, others may deal with certain digestive issues such as,
  • Heartburn
  • Regurgitation of food
  • Bloating
  • Belching
  • Stomach discomfort
Sometimes symptoms of a hiatal hernia can be confused with gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD. Your gastroenterologist will be able to determine which problem is causing your symptoms and provide you with the appropriate treatment options.

Does a hiatal hernia require treatment?

If your hiatal hernia isn’t causing you any issues then you may never need to have it treated; however, if you are experiencing any of the symptoms above you’ll want to see your gastroenterologist for an evaluation. Simple lifestyle changes may be all you need to get your symptoms under control. These changes include,
  • Maintaining a healthy weight (or losing weight if overweight or obese)
  • Eating smaller portions
  • Avoiding belts or tight pants that put pressure around the middle
  • Avoiding acidic, spicy, fatty, greasy, and fried foods
  • Avoiding carbonated beverages as well as caffeine and alcohol
  • Not eating 3-4 hours before bedtime
  • Quitting smoking
  • Elevating your head while you sleep
  • Not lying down immediately after eating
Taking an over-the-counter antacid can also help manage mild or occasional heartburn symptoms but should not be used regularly for more than two weeks. If you find that your symptoms persist for several weeks, it’s time to see your gastroenterologist.

A gastroenterologist is the ideal medical specialist to turn to when heartburn, regurgitation, acid reflux, and other digestive issues plague you. If a hiatal hernia is a culprit, we can help you find effective solutions to manage your symptoms.
By Advanced Gastroenterology Group
July 15, 2019
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Hiatal Hernia  

A hiatal hernia is when the stomach bulges through an opening in the diaphragm. Some people don’t even now that they have a hiatal hernia because it doesn’t always produce symptoms; however, some people find out that they have a hiatal hernia once they are dealing with persistent heartburn and indigestion. These symptoms are more likely to occur because a hernia makes it easier for the acids within the stomach to travel back up through the esophagus, which results in heartburn.

In most cases, self-care treatments and medications are enough to alleviate the symptoms associated with a hiatal hernia; however, if the hernia is large then the patient may require surgery. If you are dealing with persistent or severe indigestion and heartburn there are many reasons why this may be happening. While it doesn’t necessarily mean that you have a hiatal hernia it’s a good idea to see a gastroenterologist to find out what may be causing your acid reflux.

How to Treat a Hiatal Hernia

Before treating a hiatal hernia your gastroenterologist will need to diagnose your condition first. There are several tests that can determine whether you may have a hernia. These tests include a barium swallow, an endoscopy and a pH test. Once your GI doctor has determined that you have a hiatal hernia the next step is to create a treatment plan to manage your symptoms.

Again, there are a lot of people with hiatal hernias that don’t even know it because they aren’t experiencing symptoms. If your hernia isn’t causing you problems then treatment is rarely necessary. If you are dealing with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as a result of your hiatal hernia then there are some lifestyle modifications you can make to reduce your symptoms. These changes include:

  • Eating smaller meals
  • Losing excess weight if you are overweight
  • Avoiding citrus, acidic, and spicy foods
  • Limiting fried, fatty goods
  • Limiting caffeine and alcohol
  • Quitting smoking
  • Eating about 3-4 hours before bed or lying down
  • Elevating your head six inches above the rest of your body while sleeping
  • Avoiding tight clothes, which can put too much pressure on your stomach

You may even choose to take an over-the-counter antacid after eating to reduce stomach acid. Of course, these over-the-counter medications shouldn’t be taken for more than two weeks. You gastroenterologist can also prescribe a stronger antacid that you will be able to take whenever you need it to neutralize stomach acid or to block acid altogether.

Hiatal Hernia Surgery

Surgery for a hiatal hernia is not often necessary; however, if you’ve been dealing with severe reflux that isn’t alleviated with lifestyle changes or medications then surgery may be the only option. If blood flow to the part of the stomach that is sticking through the esophagus is cut off, then surgery will also be required.

If you are dealing with persistent acid reflux and indigestion it’s important to talk with your gastroenterologist to find out if a hiatal hernia could be to blame.